• 01
    ©Mona Hatoum
    Hot Spot III, 2009
    Courtesy Fondazione Querini Stampalia Onlus, Venice
    Photo Agostino Osio
  • 02
    ©Mona Hatoum
    Cellules, 2012-13
    Photo Florian Kleinefenn
    Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris
  • 03
    ©Mona Hatoum
    Undercurrent (red), 2008
    Courtesy Galerie Max Hetzer, Berlin | Paris
    Photo: Jörg von Bruchhausen
  • 04
    ©Mona Hatoum
    Cube (9×9×9), 2008
    Courtesy Galerie Max Hetzer, Berlin | Paris
    Photo: Jörg von Bruchhausen
  • 05
    ©Mona Hatoum
    Doormat II, 2000-01
    Photo Oren Slor, Courtesy Alexander and Bonin, New York
  • 06
    ©Mona Hatoum
    Grater Divide, 2002
    Photo © Iain Dickens
    Courtesy White Cube
Mona Hatoum

Outline

Established in 1989 by the City of Hiroshima, site of the first atomic bombing in human history, the Hiroshima Art Prize aims to appeal to a wider world about the “Spirit of Hiroshima,” which seeks everlasting world peace, through contemporary art. The prize is awarded once every three years, and this year we present an exhibition by Mona Hatoum, winner of the 10th Hiroshima Art Prize, at the Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art.

Mona Hatoum was born in Beirut to an exiled Palestinian family in 1952. While on a short visit to London in 1975, she was forced to remain in England after civil war broke out in Lebanon. Since then, Hatoum has created performances, videos, installations and sculptures that deal with a variety of social contradictions, such as the hardships of displaced people, political oppression, and gender issues based on her experience of double exile as a Palestinian.

This exhibition, Hatoum’s first comprehensive solo show in Japan, will introduce both important works from the past as well as new works that the artist created after accepting the prize and visiting Hiroshima. With new works that make reference to Hiroshima, this exhibition promises to inspire further universal concern over one of the most tragic events in human history.

Date:
July 29-October 15, 2017
Hours:
10:00-17:00 (Last admission 16:30)
Closed:
Mondays (except September 18 and October 9), September 19 and October 10
Admission:
Adults 1,030 (820) yen, University students 720 (620) yen, High school students and seniors [65 and over] 510 (410) yen
*Figures in parentheses: Advance purchase and groups of 30 or more
*Junior high school students and younger: Free admission
Organized by:
Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, The Asahi Shimbun
Supported by:
Hiroshima Prefecture, Hiroshima Municipal Board of Education, RCC Broadcasting Co., Ltd., Hiroshima Television Co., Ltd., Hiroshima Home Television Co., Ltd., TSS-TV Co., Ltd., Hiroshima FM Broadcasting Co., Ltd., and Onomichi FM Broadcasting Co., Ltd.

Lecture by the Artist

Speaker: Mona Hatoum
July 29, 2017, 14:00-16:00
Ticket to the exhibition necessary

Artist

Mona Hatoum

Mona Hatoum

Photo by Jim Rakete ©2006

Selected Biography

1952
Born in Beirut, Lebanon
1975-79
Byam Shaw School of Art, London
1979-81
Slade School of Art, London
1995
Shortlisted for the Turner Prize, London
2004
The Roswitha Haftmann Stiftung Prize, Zurich
2010
Käthe-Kollwitz-Preis 2010, Akademie der Künste, Berlin
2011
Joan Miró Prize 2011, Fundació Joan Miró, Barcelona

Lives and works in London and Berlin

Reason for Selection of the 10th Hiroshima Art Prize

Ms. Mona Hatoum's work deals with social contradictions and the suffering of alienated people or political oppression, based on her own complicated circumstances as a Palestinian exile. These creative endeavors greatly correspond with the aims of the Hiroshima Art Prize. Moreover, Ms. Hatoum was chosen due to our expectation that the commemorative exhibition will display new works that will squarely address and deeply engage with “Hiroshima” as a universal symbol.

Message from the artist

I accept the prize with the deepest gratitude. I am greatly honoured and humbled to be associated with the ideals of world peace for all humanity that the “Spirit of Hiroshima” stands for. Hiroshima’s experience brings to mind a very sad and low point in human history. However, the resilience and rebuilding of the city after its total annihilation, embodies the spirit of hope that inspires us all.

Gallery

Credit

All works by Mona Hatoum  ©Mona Hatoum

01.Cellules, 2012-13
Photo Florian Kleinefenn
Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris

02.No Way (Japanese spoon), 2011
Photo © White Cube (George Darrell)

03.Undercurrent (red), 2008
Cellules, 2012-13
Photo: Florian Kleinefenn
Courtesy Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris

04.Roadworks, 1985
Photo © Stefan Rohner
Courtesy Kunstmuseum St. Gallen

05.Worry Beads, 2009
Courtesy Beirut Art Center
Photo: Agop Kanledjian

06.Natura morta (medical cabinet), 2012
Photo © Hadiye Cangokçe
Courtesy ARTER, Istanbul

07.Turbulence, 2012
Photo © Stefan Rohner
Courtesy Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, Switzerland

The Hiroshima Art Prize

The city of Hiroshima established the Hiroshima Art Prize in 1989, and recipients are selected once every three years. By honoring the achievements of artists who contribute significantly to peace through art, we aim to promote art in Hiroshima, to show the world the city’s spirit of heartfelt prayer for world peace and humanity’s well-being, and to make a positive contribution to humankind.

Past Exhibitions

1

1990

2

1993

3

1996

4

1999

5

2002

6

2005

7

2008

8

2011

9

2014

The 1st Hiroshima Art Prize

1990

The 1st Hiroshima Art Prize

Issey Miyake (fashion)

November 3, 1990- January 15, 1991

The exhibition presented prominent works by Miyake from the preceding three years, from the 1989 spring/summer collection to his latest designs. The installation incorporated light and film as well as clothing.

The 2nd Hiroshima Art Prize

1993

The 2nd Hiroshima Art Prize

Robert Rauschenberg (fine art)

November 3, 1993- January 16, 1994

A retrospective covering 40 years of art by Rauschenberg, featuring approximately 110 pieces from the 1950s.

The 3rd Hiroshima Art Prize

1996

The 3rd Hiroshima Art Prize

Nancy Spero & Leon Golub (fine art)

July 27- September 23, 1996

The first retrospective in Asia for these two artists presented roughly 80 works from the preceding half-century, during which both consistently championed the causes of peace, non-violence, and human rights.

The 4th Hiroshima Art Prize

1999

The 4th Hiroshima Art Prize

Krzysztof Wodiczko (fine art)

July 25- September 19, 1999

In addition to serving as a retrospective of activities thus far, this exhibition introduced the public projections and new drawings Wodiczko created specifically for Hiroshima.

The 5th Hiroshima Art Prize

2002

The 5th Hiroshima Art Prize

Daniel Libeskind (architecture)

July 28- October 20, 2002

The powerful installation featured majestically scaled models of four buildings, including the Jewish Museum Berlin and the Imperial War Museum North, as well as architectural drawings.

The 6th Hiroshima Art Prize

2005

The 6th Hiroshima Art Prize

Shirin Neshat (fine art)

July 23- October 16, 2005

The exhibition gave an overview of the artist’s activities thus far, from early photographic series to recent video installations, many of which were shown in Japan for the first time.

The 7th Hiroshima Art Prize

2008

The 7th Hiroshima Art Prize

Cai Guo-Qiang (fine art)

October 25, 2008- January 12, 2009

The exhibition focused on those of Cai’s astoundingly diverse works that deal with the themes of war and peace, destruction and reconstruction. Large-scale new works included gunpowder drawings and an installation incorporating a wrecked ship.

The 8th Hiroshima Art Prize

2011

The 8th Hiroshima Art Prize

Yoko Ono (fine art)

July 30- October 16, 2011

Ono’s new installation conveyed a message of prayers for the repose of souls of victims of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings and the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, and pointed toward a hopeful path to the future.

第9回 ドリス・サルセド(美術)

2014

The 9th Hiroshima Art Prize

Doris Salcedo (fine art)

July 19- October 13, 2014

A large work in which red rose petals were delicately sewn one by one, and a large-scale installation featuring over 100 coffins in which grass was growing, embodied prayers for the victims of violence and the repose of souls.

Catalog

Design: Rie Shimoda
Price: 2800yen
Page: 183
Size: 182×240mm
Publish: Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art

[Contents]

  • Greetings from the Organizers
  • Greetings from Mayor of HiroshimaKazumi Matsui
  • ForewordShuji TakashinaDirector, Ohara Museum of Art/ Chair, 10th Hiroshima Art Prize Recipient Selecting Council
  • Message from the ArtistMona Hatoum
  • The Art of Displacement: Mona Hatoum’s Logic of IrreconcilablesEdward W. Said
  • DisbelongingPatricia Falguières
  • Out of PlaceMotoko SuhamaSenior Curator, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art
  • Biography
  • List of Exhibited Works
  • Outline of the Hiroshima Art Prize

[INQUIRY]

hcmca@hcmca.cf.city.hiroshima.jp

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