[ 2016 Schedule ]

2016.04 - 2017.03

Special Exhibitions

March 18- May 21, 2017

Tadashi Tonoshiki : the Source of a Compelling Reversal

Self-taught, Hiroshima-born artist Tadashi Tonoshiki (1942-1992) was heralded for meticulously executed paintings and prints in which he dealt with his and his parents’ experiences of the atomic bomb. In later years, based on a critical view of contemporary consumer society, Tonoshiki created dynamic installations using waste and flotsam as materials. Then, just as anticipation was running high for his work, he suddenly died at the age of 50. Looking back on Tonoshiki’s career on the 25th anniversary of the artist’s death, this exhibition attempts to determine his significance in the present day.

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October 28, 2016- January 22, 2017

THE WORLD IS STRANGE!: THE MANGA AND PAINTINGS OF TIGER TATEISHI AND YUICHI YOKOYAMA

Tiger Tateishi (1941-1998) is known for a diverse range of work, including panoramic paintings filled with images that exemplify the era, humorous manga, picture books, and fantastic ceramics. Yuichi Yokoyama (b. 1967), meanwhile, has received acclaim for his unique neo-manga, which, while lacking either story or plot and making frequent use of panel layout, speech balloons, and onomatopoetic and mimetic words, dynamically express the passage of time with a sense of speed. This exhibition explores the charms of the two artists, who create a surrealistic and nonsensical world in their works by making the most of the distinctive features of painting and manga.

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July 30- October 10, 2016

1945±5: War and Reconstruction – How Artists Faced the Turbulent Period

In the 1940s, Japan plunged headlong into the Pacific War and continued fighting until it was defeated in 1945. Over the next five years while occupied by Allied Forces, the country experienced a variety of ups and downs as it moved forward with a variety of reforms and restoration projects. Based on approximately 200 works (primarily Western-style paintings, but also Japanese-style paintings, sculptures, documents, etc.) by some 70 artists, this exhibition attempts to ascertain what kind of art was made during the period and how it was linked to society. Viewers will be presented with a complete picture of Japanese art from the 1940s, a period marked by a wide range of intersecting perspectives and positions.

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May 28- July 18, 2016

Shomei Tomatsu: NAGASAKI

Shomei Tomatsu (1930-2012), one of postwar Japan’s most prominent photographers, first traveled to Nagasaki on a shoot in 1961. The results were published in a collaboration with Ken Domon and others called hiroshima-nagasaki document 1961. This visit made such an impact on Tomatsu that he began making regular trips to Nagasaki the following year and eventually moved to the city in 1998, while constantly taking pictures of atomic-bomb victims and the townscape. This exhibition presents a collection of these works, capturing the rebirth of Nagasaki (which like Hiroshima had been burned to the ground in the bombing), including aspects of the local history and cultural climate, from a unique perspective.

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March 19- May 15, 2016

Dinh Q. Lê: Memory for Tomorrow

Dinh Q. Lê (b. 1968), one of the most acclaimed Asian artists today, left his homeland of Vietnam at the age of ten and moved to the U.S. After studying photography and media art, Lê adopted a variety of media including photography, sculpture, and video installations, based on painstaking research and interviews. He has consistently addressed the issues of war and immigration from his base in Ho Chi Minh City. In this exhibition, we reconsider the relationship between individual experience and history through Lê’s works.

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Collection Exhibitions

October 8, 2016- January 22, 2017

2016-3 Collection Highlights & the Special Display: “Listening”

This exhibition is made up of two parts: “Collection Highlights,” and a special display titled “Listening.”
“Collection Highlights,” consisting of a group of works that were specially selected from the museum collection, introduces a diverse range of contemporary art expressions. From these works, we realize that although the motif might be the same, the approach and production method can vary greatly. In this edition, we focus on people and the human body. In the special display, “Listening,” we encourage viewers to prick up their ears and listen carefully to the works.

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June 18- September 25, 2016

2016-2 Collection Highlights & the Special Display: “Contempsorary Art of ‘Hirohima’”

This exhibition is made up of two parts: “Collection Highlights” and a special display called “Contemporary Art of ‘Hiroshima’”.

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February 28-June 5, 2016

2016-1 An Abundance of Sei - Life, Vigor, Thrive, and Spirit

In this exhibition, we consider the enigmatic “something” that is exuded by a work of art by examining four keywords, which share the same pronunciation but are written with different kanji character: 生、勢、盛、and 精.

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Open Programs

Architectural models of Le Corbusier’s works

At the 40th session of the World Heritage Committee, held in Istanbul in July 2016, the architecture of Le Corbusier was designated as a World Heritage for its “outstanding contribution to the modern movement.” This heritage, consisting of 17 works in seven countries, including the National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo, attracted a great deal of attention in Japan.…

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March 18- March 31, 2017

Open Call for Design Ideas of “Hiroshima Brand” 2016

In Open Call for Art Project Ideas 2016, artists are invited to submit works that make unlimited use of the museum’s public space. And in Open Call for “Hiroshima Brand” Designs 2016, people are invited to submit their designs for local products. The winning submissions in both projects will be disp…

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November 5- November 27, 2016

Open Call for Art Project Ideas 2016

Open Call for Art Project Ideas 2016 is an open program in which artists are invited to show their work in a free public space at the Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art (Hiroshima MOCA). The program accepts proposals from both Japan- and foreign-based artists that are designed for a space outside the galleries in the museum (designed by Kisho Kurokawa) and that make the most of the space’s special characteristics.

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July 16- September 11, 2016

Summer Workshop Project 2016: This World or the Next One?

Open to all ages, from children to adults, this program allows visitors to experience the diverse range of expressions in contemporary art. Based on the theme of creating of an extraordinary world out of ordinary things, in this year’s program, we welcome Kotaro Sekiguchi, who makes a variety of things, from large objects made of newspaper and gummed tape to delicate constructions, and Takako Susai, who makes small creatures out of cloth and plastic. Teeming with wondrous creatures, the space will allow participants to watch, touch, make, and experience art in many different ways. Workshops conducted by participating artists are also scheduled during the exhibition period.

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Video Art Programs

[The 54th Program] Gabrielle Le Bayon

Tender Pastures, 2014, HD video, color, sound, 6min.05sec. The title of this work, Tender Pastures, is a quotation from the novel Molloy by the Irish-born playwright and novelist Samuel Beckett. A lone man stands in a flat, featureless landscape, and we hear his voice speaking and a strange, soft co…

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[The 53rd Program] Rebecca Morrison

Once in a Lullaby, part of the series of video works Quartet, is primarily composed of scenes at an amusement park, capturing the unpretentious appearance and behavior of people enjoying the attractions, and the colorful, gaudy design of the environment reflecting the unsophisticated tastes of its intended occupants…

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[The 52nd Program] Sven Johne

Sven Johne was born in 1976 on Rügen, an island in the Baltic Sea that was formerly part of East Germany. Many of Johne’s works are concerned with the East German era, and they carefully examine events and people that were known locally. The title of this work, Elmenhorst, is the name of a city on the Baltic Sea that was past of East Germany when the country was divided.…

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[The 51st Program] Pierre-Jean Giloux

Formed in 1960, the Metabolism Group derived its name from a biological term, and held that architectural structures and cities should be organically designed in a manner analogous to the way living things grow and go through changes. Based on this philosophy, they advanced many innovative architectural designs and urban planning proposals. …

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March 23- May 15, 2016

[The 50th Program] Dennis Hlynsky

Starlings Decide to Change Lines, 2015, color, sound, 2 min. 30 sec. Fruit Flies Draw a Bowl of Ripe Fruit Shot from above, 2015, color, sound, 2 min. In Starlings Decide to Change Lines, Dennis Hlynsky used a high-speed camera to film countless starlings perched on power lines all taking flight at …

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