Special ExhibitionLegendary Houses in Postwar Japan – Provocative / Introspective

What do houses reflect and suggest about societal change? The Legendary Houses in Postwar Japan – Provocative / Introspective exhibition examines 16 now legendary houses and the concepts of the 16 architects who designed them during Japan’s postwar high-growth period, which ran from the 1950s to the 1970s.
Beginning with House (1953) by Kenzo Tange, who designed Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and Peace Memorial Park, which came to symbolize Hiroshima after the war, architects have confronting a variety of issues related to “living” while exploring spatial expression, finding inspiration in traditional forms and meditating on the relationship between houses and urban communities.

In the 1960s, Kazuo Shinohara declared, “A house is a work of art.” As houses emerged that resembled impoverished spaces, people began to advocate the importance of residential architecture. After Expo ’70 in Osaka, Japanese architects began to emphasize interiors and explore innovative expressions by dividing planes and raising objections to conventional practices. Built on extremely small lots and under restricted conditions, Japanese houses have not always been blessed with ideal circumstances. Architecture from this era of modernization in which close attention was paid to houses in personal and human spaces provides us with a new perspective in reconsidering present-day living spaces.

In the 1960s, Kazuo Shinohara declared, “A house is a work of art.” As houses emerged that resembled impoverished spaces, people began to advocate the importance of residential architecture. After Expo ’70 in Osaka, Japanese architects began to emphasize interiors and explore innovative expressions by dividing planes and raising objections to conventional practices. Built on extremely small lots and under restricted conditions, Japanese houses have not always been blessed with ideal circumstances. Architecture from this era of modernization in which close attention was paid to houses in personal and human spaces provides us with a new perspective in reconsidering present-day living spaces.

Architects, Works

1:Kenzo Tange, House, 1953
2:Makoto Masuzawa, Residence for Mr.H. Planned by Center Core System, 1953
3:Kiyoshi Seike, Seike House, 1954
4:Arata Isozaki, Shinjuku White House, 1957
5:Kiyonori Kikutake, Sky House, 1958
6:Takamitsu Azuma, Tower House, 1966
7:Kazuo Shinohara, House in White, 1966
8:Kazunari Sakamoto, Machiya in Minase, 1970
9:Seiichi Shirai, Kohaku-an, 1970
10:Mayumi Miyawaki, Matsukawa Box, 1971/78
11:Kikoo Mozuna, Anti-dwelling Box, 1972
12:Kisho Kurokawa, Nakagin Capsule Tower Building, 1972
13:Hiroshi Hara, Hara House, 1974
14:Osamu Ishiyama, Gen-an, 1975
15:Toyo Ito, White U, 1976
16:Tadao Ando, Row House,Sumiyoshi, 1976

Date October 4-December 7, 2014
Hours 10:00-17:00 (Last admission 16:30)
*10:00-19:00 on October 12 and 13
Closed Mondays (except October 13, November 3, 24), October 14, November 4 and 25
Admission Adults 1,030 (820) yen, university students 720 (620) yen, high school students, senior[65 years old and over] 510 (410) yen
*Figures in parentheses: Advance purchase and groups of 30 or more
*Junior high school students and younger: Free admission
*All free admission on November 3
Organized by Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, The Yomiuri Shimbun, The Japan Association of Art Museums
Supported by Hiroshima Prefecture, Hiroshima Municipal Board of Education, Hiroshima FM Broad Casting Co., Ltd., Onomichi FM Broad Casting Co., Ltd.
With assistance from Lion Corporation, Shimizu Corporation, Dai Nippon Printing Co., Ltd., Sompo Japan and Nipponkoa Insurance Inc.